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6 thoughts on “ngp software

  1. 1. My goal: I was seeking a GPS unit so I could locate my barn photographs after I had taken them (other than writing down street addresses and photographing mail boxes). My camera is a Nikon D300s.2. Key issues: I sought an efficient means to locate/geotag my barn photos without a lot of hassle. Focused issues began with how long does it take to “lock on” to a reading. It reportedly takes longer to lock in cloudy weather and inside a building, although the latter was not a major concern for me in my photographing barns. Second was breakage problems noted in reviews. Cost was a third issue since I was not sure how well this technology would work for me. All units I considered draw on the camera battery, requiring more frequent battery changes. The unit also must be turned off separately from the camera or it will be a drain. All units fit on the shoe above the flip up flash, so the flash cannot be used when the GPS is located there. Since the unit does not use an electronic connection on the shoe, it is possible to allow the GPS to dangle or fasten it to the strap in order to use the shoe or flash.3. Options rejected: My research caused me to reject two options. First was the Nikon GP-1 GPS. Its price is the highest of all the units I considered ($200), and the reviews were very mixed on how well it worked, including “lock on” time, and customer service. The Geometr GPS Receive Nikon DSLR ($146) was the second I decided not to consider further. Several reviewers reported it broke very easily. There were mixed responses about service in the reviews.4. Final options for decision were two: First was the Promote GPS N-1 ($150). It had none of the breakage reports of the ones I rejected. Its “lock on” time was also faster than the others. It got excellent reviews including for its service. (The first reviewer on the Amazon site for the Promote provides a helpful basic primer on GPS SLR camera units.) The other option was the Columbus nGPS Unit for DSLR. It appears to be most recent on the market. Its price was the lowest ($110), its “lock on” speed was reported to be faster than all the others. There were not as many reviews but they were all rave with some mention of good service.5. Choice: After much deliberation, I picked the Columbus nGPS, for its fast “lock on,” excellent reviews and lower price. I conjectured the fast times might be because it had newer technology.6. Purchase: I bought the Columbus nGPS unit for DSLR through Amazon for $109.95 plus $7.99 shipping and handling. (It came quickly, although shipped by a different outfit than listed by Amazon.) Included with it is the cord for the GPS unit plus a hand held shutter release that plugs into the GPS (a bonus I had not expected), with another cord and a short strap.7. Experience: a. Set-up. This was done almost accidentally. I figured, given other electronic experiences with my camera and computers, it would take a lot of study of the manual plus trail and error. The package arrived just a few minutes before leaving for a trip so I brought it along. While eating lunch on the way I read the first two pages of the manual. (I had already checked my Nikon book and saw the place for GPS menu settings.) While waiting for my food, I went outside in the sun to see how the unit’s indicator light functioned after I put the GPS on my camera and plugged it in. The flashing searching light quickly turned constant, indicating “lock on.”b. Field testing. I have just used the Columbus nGPS unit in Vermont in the rain, the type of weather when “lock on” is reported to be much slower. It locked on within 5 seconds, and did this repeatedly even after I turned the unit (and camera) off and started over in other locations. (It “locked on” in 30 seconds inside my office at home.)c. How it worked: When I downloaded the pictures to Lightroom 2, GPS data appeared at the bottom of the metadata list for each photo. An arrow appears to right of the GPS data. I clicked on the arrow and voila up came a Google map showing an aerial view of where I was standing when the picture was taken, along with street address! I could clearly see the barns I had photographed. I had not expected the whole process to be so simple and to do just what I had wanted it to do.d. Other reflections. The unit is quite small, smaller than I had expected, and does not impact how I carry and pack my camera. The cord has not proven to be in the way. My battery, which had been in the camera for quite a while, did run low in the day I used it. It seemed easy to remember to turn off the GPS off between locations because the single green “on light” is on the back of the unit right above the off/on switch. Further time will determine more about durability and battery drainage, but everything is off to a very good start.

  2. I was very hopeful when purchasing this unit. It’s in the middle price point for it’s competitors, as there are $99 options and there are $250 options.Several issues:1. First and foremost, the cable connecting the unit to the camera was of very poor quality. The metal housing around the connector piece actually got stuck inside my brand new Nikon D7000!!! This is a nightmare had it damaged the camera. Also, the cable doesn’t have a right angle to it, so it just sticks out the side of the camera. Very obviously no one tested this out in the field, and just in a lab. It makes it super easy to break. I was worried it would snap off just being held inside the house, so much as in the field.2. The LED on top of the unit is very very bright. Had this not been a defective item due to the cable, I would have had to cover the LED with nail polish or something. It actually was hurting my photography capability because I’d lose my night vision each time I looked at the camera.3. Lack of heading information is a minus.Overall I cannot recommend this unit. If it was $50 I’d better understand. But for how inexpensive it must be to make these units, it’s way too cheaply built. The cable issue is just horrible. A right angle and a cable that doesn’t come apart inside your camera would be a good start.On the positive side, the time it took to acquire a signal was pretty quick.

  3. I was in a time crunch when I purchased this geotagger for my Nikon D90. I desperately wanted to geotag all my photos from our upcoming family trip to Taos, New Mexico, but I had read many reviews suggesting that the Nikon geotagger was overpriced and not very good so I needed to look elsewhere. There were better reviewed products out there, but I couldn’t get them in time so I went with this Columbus model.I emphasize that I’ve only had it for 3 weeks or so, but in that time I’ve carried it across states, up mountains (and volcanoes), down mountains (and volcanoes), deep within the earth, across plains and through subdivision yards. I LOVE it.The cable: yes, it’s dumb that it sticks out at 90 degrees; yes, it really, really has to get crammed into the port to get seated, but so far it has held up well. There is nothing remotely loose about it, nothing bent, nothing that appears to be on the verge of breaking. I have had the unit seated in the hot shoe and I have also used the supplied strap clip and I’ve also had to pop it off the shoe so the built in flash would pop up and just left it hanging in the meantime. Let me be clear that I have to be one of the world’s roughest camera carriers. For our road trip I had it lying on the floor at my feet, in a pile with my laptop, books, food and whatever else so I could grab it on the fly, which I did – a lot. When we moved our luggage I’d cram it in a laptop backpack. I was careful to place it so the cable wasn’t forced or wedged against anything, but aside from that it really got tossed around.The unit: the little light didn’t bother me at all, but it was partially obscured by the camera armor hot shoe cover that I had to flip up to allow the tagger to mount (I told you I’m rough on cameras – I needed and love the armor, too). The longest I had to wait for a satellite reading was probably about 40 seconds, if that. However, we were in the middle of nowhere most of the time, no tall city buildings or anything to block signal. But we were also in the mountains around Taos and even in the valleys I got speedy linkage. Most of the time the satellite lock was within a couple of seconds – literally. Another thing to note is that it’s really very small. I think it’s hard to judge whether these units will be obtrusive or not, but this isn’t. It fits on my hot shoe or my strap and doesn’t interfere with anything. Also, I really didn’t notice much of a drain on my battery. I did turn it and the camera off if I was between “photo shoots” (I use that term loosely since we’re talking about my photos) and I recharged the camera battery once on our week-long trip. I did NOT leave the tagger on all the time. If my camera went off, it did, too. After I realized it didn’t take long for the satellite lock I just turned it on when I needed it.Post photo-taking: WOW. I looked up the GPS info in my photo menus on the camera and VOILA! there were our coordinates and elevation (this totally rocked when I was at the top of a ski mountain and wanted to know the elevation!). I uploaded some of my favorite photos to Picasa and again VOILA! without doing a thing extra there’s a link on the album page straight to Google Maps. All of my photos show up on the map indicating EXACTLY where we had been when I took the pictures. I may be a total geek, but it’s one of the coolest things I’ve seen. The map shows that we saw the golden eagle between Raton and the Capulin Volcano, that we were at about 8500 feet in elevation at Sipapu Resort and that it was near Mountain Home, Texas that the speed limit went to 80MPH. I should emphasize that it does NOT hold the latest coordinates once you turn it off or lose satellites. I thought that would bother me, but it didn’t. We could have driven 100 miles between photos and I wouldn’t want it to pick up the wrong location. I guess it would have been nice if my Carlsbad Cavern photos from 750 feet underground were tagged to the coordinates from the cavern sign photo, but it wasn’t a big deal.My only regret with this product is that I didn’t have it for our 5500 mile, 22 state road trip last summer.PS. If, somewhere down the road, the cable breaks or something disappointing happens with this unit I’ll revisit this review. For now, I LOVE it!

  4. Awesome phone, rating for phone NOT pricethis is NOT the suggested list price for the phone. Buy online from U.K. For just under 600 US dollarsDon’t pay more than you have to for this awesome querty awesome battery life phone!

  5. Price was ridiculous at CDN$~1,200 but got to me in 6 days and prior to release from other vendors.Very happy returning to the “qwertz” keyboard

  6. Continues a tradition of replacing impressionable codenames with weird final names. BlackBerry’s second Android device is durable, battery-lenient, and well-built; a step up from its powerful but irritatingly flawed predecessor. Panel gaps and other imperfections are noticeable but not detrimental to the phone’s build quality.The prevalence of metal on the KeyOne’s frame is a refreshing step up from the PRIV, showing itself where it can where the latter could not with its soft plastic body. There is no doubt it is a divisive design, blending together elements of the Passport Silver Edition and the shapely forms of the iPhone 6-onward. This makes for an unconventional mixture of feelings; it’s crisp and soft. It’s chiseled and rounded. Some will call it one of the best designs BlackBerry’s approved in years, and some will be off-put by its inconsistency. The back is covered mostly in a soft rubber plastic, good for traction and grip. It is not impossible to be reminded by the design of the dignified and sophisticated black leather and stained metal finishes that were seen across cameras from Kodak, Nikon and Leica in the 1960s. It is also not impossible to be reminded of them in spirit either, in the KeyOne’s assuring weight and solid, professional feel.The keyboard continues the phone’s iPhone influences, with a glossy finish (the fingerprint reading spacebar is matte) and a rounded finishing piece. It’s a clicky QWERTY setup with satisfyingly deep button presses and some useful UI functions, offering quick and long-press shortcuts to apps and phone functions, as well as being able to be used as a trackpad for scrolling through web pages, as well as a variety of other uses. As a keyboard, it should make quick work of long paragraphs and sentences with few errors for most, as the author of the Fifty Shades of Grey series of books can attest – though one can argue to an extent that the series itself is one long error. Emails, word documents and texting becomes less focus intensive than on a touchscreen and becomes more comfortable. And jokes aside, it can be used as an effective writer’s tool for those finding a good way to capture ideas in the moment. Some units may come with a historically persistent issue in that the keyboard’s spacebar (which also functions as a very quick and accurate fingerprint reader) may be more sensitive to light presses on one corner than the other. It is unknown whether this is an intended detail or a minor, commonly overlooked production defect, and its value depends on the user. The keyboard, of course, means screen space will be sacrificed, but screen size is still decent if one can deal with its unconventional orientation. The screen itself produces colours accurately and is very visible in daylight under moderate brightness. Screen sensitivity isn’t as good as on an iPhone, Samsung or OnePlus. Unlike the mentioned 3, where scrolling and tapping is instant and feels like you are in direct, complete control of the screen, the KeyOne has a noticeably slower feel. That sort of immediate feeling you’d expect is found in the capacitive keyboard instead.The PRIV unit this reviewer owned had some peculiar characteristics. It had a chipset that should’ve been snappy and powerful but lagged often and overheated. It had a large battery that drained quickly and unpredictably. BlackBerry addressed these issues in the KeyOne by focusing on optimisation and efficiency. It runs a less powerful but more modern chipset with smooth all-round performance, and can hold a charge for as long as a whole day under moderate use. Its screen size and power may put off some users who expect to be able to play games smoothly and quickly though.The KeyOne comes with Android Nougat out of the box, with BlackBerry promising on-line updates for the foreseeable future. it comes with BlackBerry’s own custom launcher which aims to be as close to stock Android as possible. Not only that, but it enables the mentioned keyboard shortcuts, so using other launchers may disable them. Swiping down on certain apps will display their widgets, which can save screen space and processing power.The camera used is the same one used on the Google, Pixel, judged to have arguably one of the best cameras on the market. it doesn’t have the same programming that polishes pictures on the Pixel, but it works well enough. It’s not the best, but it’s good. Pictures come out on Snapchat muddy and blurry, as it is not optimised for the phone’s orientation and screen size, but pictures taken from Instagram come out phenomenally, especially in the right conditions. The selfie camera isn’t as good, taking less sharp images, but it works.Overall, the BlackBerry KeyOne is a fantastic device all-round, and one of the finest BlackBerry-branded devices as of yet. A robust, reliable workhorse with some useful and neat features meant to juggle your day’s demands, look good doing it, and leave a few hours of battery life for you when you get home.

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